Research

Research plays an important role within our hospitals and help us to improve the lives of our patients, through better diagnosis, treatment and improved care or cures.

The charity has committed to providing £600,000 each year to support a wide variety of research. The charity aims to fund pioneering research to improve the diagnosis treatment and prevention of many diseases. The support of the charity will help to provide start-up funding for promising early stage research projects, support excellent aspiring young researchers and will assist in the development of new innovations.

We are currently funding a number of research projects within our hospitals, including:

  • At Royal Manchester Children's Hospital we are supporting a project that could help children with asthma. Poorly and tired asthmatic children often find it difficult to use their inhalers effectively and this study is using a computer game to entice them to use the spacer inhaler correctly.
  • Over at the eye hospital we are supporting a project that is testing a new type of camera to diagnose and monitor eye diseases. This multispectral camera is being tested to see if it can be used to study the blood vessels at the back of the retina. The restriction of the blood supply can lead to blindness if not treated in time. Patients with glaucoma, age related Macular Degeneration and sight loss due to diabetes could all benefit from this technology.
  • At Saint Mary's Hospital our support is helping with a study in to the drug Metformin as a treatment for endometrial cancers. Endometrial (womb) cancer is the most common cancer of the reproductive tract in women and the incidence of it is increasing. This study is looking at the effect of giving women a commonly used diabetic drug called Metformin before their surgery to see if it slows down the growth of the tumour.
  • While over at Manchester Royal Infirmary we are supporting the trial of a new treatment to reduce the side-effects of diabetes. The charity is contributing to a large study that is evaluating a new treatment called TETA that is being used to reduce the levels of copper in the blood of diabetic patients. It is thought that lowering the copper levels may reduce the complications of diabetes such as vision loss. The funding is being used towards buying equipment needed for the study and paying for retina scanning tests.
  • At the Dental Hospital we helped with a study that looked at using sedation as an alternative to a general anaesthetic in the management of severely anxious teenage patients. Extreme anxiety can deter young people from having dental treatment and as a result many have terrible problems with their teeth. This research project used a form of sedation instead of a general anaesthetic during dental treatment. Nearly all of the patients in the study were able to complete their treatment and this study gave the team the evidence they needed to obtain the funding to offer this type of sedation as a routine service.

To find out more about all of the research projects we are currently supporting please contact the Charity Team on 0161 276 4522.